Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Current Reads

I have a habit of reading multiple books at a time.  I really wouldn't call it a bad habit, because it works just fine for me...but the reason I do it is because different books work for different moods.  I read a lot of nonfiction books (usually nutrition) and processing science isn't always the easiest thing to do right before bedtime.  As such, I usually have 6-10 books going at a time, which I keep in a basket by the couch and pull out as needed.  Some books I zoom right through, and others take a couple months.

So right now, here's where I'm at.

Wise Traditions, the quarterly journal from the Weston A. Price Foundation...I'm working my way through their backlog of journals and this is the current one I'm on.  Their founder is the author of Nourishing Traditions, which is the groundbreaking book for traditional foods and nutrition.


Tipperary, by Frank Delaney.  It's a novel about Ireland, by an author I've read elsewhere and enjoyed.  I have an inexplicable soft spot for Irish history, so I'm always drawn to books like this.  I'm not too far in, but thus far it appears to be a good read.


Founding Gardeners.  This one fascinates me, but it wouldn't appeal to everyone.  It combines two topics I'm a big fan of-- American history and gardening.  It's interesting to read about how invested the founding fathers were in their gardens, which is a cute euphemism for "grand, impressively landscaped estates".  Bonus: I'm picking up bits of history along the way. (Stories are always the best and easiest way to learn history.)


Prodigal Summer, by Barbara Kingsolver.  I'm about one chapter in and not sure if it's going to grip me or not.  She's a good writer as far as skill goes, but her storylines don't always interest me.  I loved her book "Animal, Vegetable, Miracle", so I decided to give some of her novels a shot, even though I didn't really enjoy them in highschool.  We'll see if I finish it or not.


My First Two Thousand Years.  I'm a sucker for old books, but this one wasn't a random pick.  It's the story (well, one of many, since it's a pretty generic legend) of the Wandering Jew.  I first came across a reference to it in the Anne of Green Gables series (book 7, I think).  The legend goes that a Jew who was present at the crucifixion of Christ refused to help carry the cross, so was cursed to remain living until the Second Coming.  I have two different books written on the basis of this legend, but so far this one has snagged my interest more than the other.  It's a series of vignettes about a life lived over 2000 years of history (ish...it was written in the first half of the 1900s).


The Baby/Child version of the Nourishing Traditions series.  This came out earlier this year and is a fantastic resource for real nutrition in pregnancy, birth, babies, and young children.  No, we're not pregnant.  I read stuff like this for fun.  I'm a hoot at parties.


The $64 Tomato.  A hilarious memoir of a gardener...this is the second time I've read it, mostly because it made me laugh the first time.


Don Quixote.  This book isn't exactly a fun read, although it has its moments.  I'm reading it as part of a lengthy "read the classics" project that I'm working on.  This is ostensibly the first true novel in history, written back in the early 1600s.  It's certainly a book you have to force yourself to keep going on, but it does have some pithy insights to human nature and various topics that are amusing and make the effort more worthwhile.


And that's it for this point in time...I'm sure there'll be a new line up before too long, especially now that winter is about to set in.  That's totally reading season.  :-)  What's everybody else reading right now?

12 comments :

  1. I would think you'd need some Anne to water down Don Quixote. :-)

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    1. I'm taking a short sabbatical from Anne so I can appreciate her properly when I read them again. :-D

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  2. Kingsolver has some real interesting viewpoints in her books...

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    1. I know, and I don't agree with most of them (that I can remember, anyway). She's definitely an interesting person. But she's also actually a skilled writer, which seems like it's getting rarer and rarer amongst the popular selling books. (Not that there's a dearth of actual skilled writers, just that they don't sell as well as, say, Fifty Shades of Gray. Slightly disturbing.)

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  3. Ooo! I'm reading the scarlet pimpernel! Love it!

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    1. I've actually never read that. What's it about? I always confuse it with the Scarlet Letter when I hear the title.

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  4. I have to say that "Don Quixote" is one of my all time favorites! It was originally written in Spanish, and the quality of translation varies widely. The first time I read it was a fairly old translation and it was hilarious. The one currently on my bookshelf just doesn't capture the same humor.

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  5. Mine must be a decent translation, because it's made me laugh out loud a few times. At this point, however, (chapter 43 of 72) I'm really over DQ's ridiculousness and just finishing the book out of sheer stubbornness. :-D

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  6. I had to count my current books being read. I am reading 4 right now on my phone/kindle, and have 4 others at home I am working on. Must be a genetic problem. Mine are all nonfiction, and a mix of bread, food, spirituality, and personal growth.

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    1. Sounds like you need to add a beach read to the mix to lighten it up a bit...after all, you DO live in Hawaii. :-)

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  7. I recently finished Sarah's Key, which is about the French taking part in Hitler's hatred toward the Jews. Interesting story line regarding the history, but the writer wraps it into the modern world by writing every other chapter about a journalist who is exploring this history and the historical side is only revealed as she learns of it. I could have done without her side....every other chapter about the Jewish girl, Sarah, was good, tho!

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    1. Wow, that sounds intense but super interesting. I love history in story form, it's so much easier to remember and take in!

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