Tuesday, November 5, 2013

One Pan Chicken Alfredo


I'm apparently on a recipe odyssey lately, cooking more new recipes than I do old ones.  In some ways this is a nice switch from the norm-- but it's also really expensive, because if we don't like a dish, it obviously ends up-- no, not in the trash.  In the chicken pen.  But monetarily, that's kind of the same thing.

At any rate, yesterday I was gifted this recipe and promptly decided to make it for dinner...and was suitably impressed. Seriously, I have made I don't even know how many different variations of alfredo sauce, trying to convince myself that everybody's obsession with it was justified...but no luck.  I've never been an alfredo fan.  But the more I try to find ways to sneak fat into our diet, and the more delighted I become with the magic of sprouted wheat (follow-up post to come), the more appealing an alfredo dish has become.  I buy my sprouted wheat pasta here (affiliate link).  It's a little spendy, but we don't do pasta often, and it's the one wheat product I buy and I doubt I'll ever attempt to make it at home.  We're finding that we feel much better on sprouted products, and it does away with a lot of that heavy pasta feeling.

As such, here is an easy alfredo recipe.  There are a couple variations on it to minimize effort if necessary.

INGREDIENTS
2-4 chicken breasts depending on size, OR 2 c. leftover or shredded chicken
8 oz. pasta of choice
1 c. cream
3-4 cloves minced garlic
1 c. milk
1/4 c. butter
2 c. water
1 c. cream cheese (optional)
1 1/2 c. shredded parmesan

Optional: 2 c. mozzarella or other white cheese

First step: cook your chicken.  This makes the dish take longer and isn't necessary if you have leftover or canned chicken sitting around, but I wanted the flavor from frying it up.  I used bacon grease, for this, by the way.  Another way to get saturated fats in-- and there's not too many dishes that don't taste better if the frying part is done in bacon grease.  :-)  After the chicken is done, dice it up.  Make sure you have two cups...the breasts I fried up were smaller and ended up producing about one cup of meat, and it definitely messed up the ratio of the dish.

Step two: add in the rest of the ingredients. The cream cheese is optional-- that was a whim on my part, both to use up half a stick of cream cheese that was sitting in the fridge, and to add some more fat.  Bring this to a boil and reduce to low, simmering for 15-20 minutes, until pasta is done.  (Your choice of pasta will affect this, so keep an eye on it.)

Side note: did you know that eating lots of saturated fats with high glycemic foods actually slows their release into your blood system and mitigates the glycemic effects?  That was specifically why I wanted to add more fat to a pasta dish, and why you should always eat your baked potato with a lot of butter or sour cream.


When your pasta is done to your liking, stir in your parmesan cheese, letting it get all melty.  At this point you can serve it, or you can add the optional mozzarella on top and throw it under the broiler for a few minutes to brown.  We did ours without, and it was still exceptional.


Serve while hot!

7 comments :

  1. I love Alfredo sauce! Back when we used to eat this my recipe called for cream cheese too...it was the best :)

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  2. I dunno. Sounds like a stomach ache to me. I don't think my gallbladder has enough bile in it to digest all that fat. Or something.

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  3. Spoilsport. :-) It sat fine with ut but this would be a recipe worth taking hcl or enzymes just so you could enjoy it properly. :-)

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    1. Wel-l-l, we'll see. (How's that for a noncomittal cop-out?) ;-)

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    2. I have to admit I was taken aback by your comment after all your verbal cravings for pasta lately!

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    3. Pasta, yes . . . all that fat, no. Lasagna or spaghetti sound soooo good right now.

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  4. I dunno about you but whenever I cook chicken that needs to be cubed I cube it before I cook it, its easier to cut in my opinion when its slightly frozen and it seems easier to get it all seasoned really well

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